What Is Culturally Responsive Teaching?

Monday, April 18, 2022

Associate teaching professor and Elementary Teacher Education Program (ELTEP) director Teddi Beam-Conroy, James A. and Cherry A. Banks Professor of Multicultural Education Django Paris, professor emerita Geneva Gay and alumna Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings (M.Ed. '72) are featured in a recent article by EducationWeek titled “What Is Culturally Responsive Teaching?” As states across the nation are considering laws to ban critical race theory being used in schools, the article unpacks what it means to be a culturally responsive teacher, how the various research terms are related and where other academic concepts such as critical race theory tie in – or not.

Pandemic took a toll on teen mental health, US study says

Thursday, March 31, 2022

Professor of School Psychology James Mazza was featured in a King5 segment titled “Pandemic took a toll on teen mental health, US study says.” In the video, he discusses how schools and parents can work with their students to check in on their mental health, especially after school closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Washington education administrator advances to Senate confirmation to become Biden’s special education chief

Thursday, February 17, 2022

Director of the Haring Center for Inclusive Education and Professor of Special Education, Ilene Schwartz is quoted in an article by The Spokesman Review regarding the nomination of Washington education administrator Glenna Gallo to lead the U.S. Education Department’s special education program. “I think she’s fabulous,” said Ilene. “The only bad thing I can say about her is she’s going to leave Washington state.”

Seattle’s Academy for Rising Educators aims to fill a critical classroom need

Tuesday, February 15, 2022

The Seattle Times featured alumni who founded the Academy for Rising Educators (ARE) program Dr. Keisha Scarlett (Leadership for Learning Ph.D. graduate) and Dr. Sheila Edwards Lange (Ph.D. graduate and recipient of the 2013 College of Education Distinguished Alumni Award). ARE Program Manager at Seattle Public Schools, Kenderick “K.O.” Wilson (2014 M.E.P graduate and current Ph.D. student) and Sophath Keith (current SPED-TEP candidate) are also featured. The program is funded through the Families, Education, Preschool and Promise Levy, with additional support from the College of Education and Seattle Education Association.

WA House bill would expand outdoor education statewide

Monday, February 14, 2022

The Seattle Times published an article titled “WA House bill would expand outdoor education statewide” and featured  Islandwood Graduate Program in Education and Community students Marina Hydeman, Keaton Aldrich and Grace Sunitsch. Islandwood, an outdoor camp on Bainbridge Island, has demonstrated how outdoor education should be a must-have, rather than a nice-to-have for school districts across the state. Congratulations to our students, as well as faculty and staff involved with the program: Professor of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Mark Windschitl and Associate Professor of Teaching, Learning and Curriculum Jessica Thompson, and Islandwood Director of Graduate and Higher Education Programming Déana Scipio (Ph.D. in Learning Sciences, ’15).

The Athletics Money Monster: Presidents created the mess in college sports. Can they fix it?

Friday, February 11, 2022

Jennifer Lee Hoffman, associate professor in Educational Foundations, Leadership & Policy and faculty member at the Center for Leadership in Athletics was quoted in an article for The Chronicle of Higher Education titled “The Athletics Money Monster – Presidents created the mess in college sports. Can they fix it?” In the article, Jennifer points out that the scope of reform for college sports is just too big for institutions to handle on their own. “If we want real reform, we are going to have to do something different, the only example I can think of is at the federal level,” Hoffman says.

Washington students’ test scores drop significantly in first exams since pandemic began

Tuesday, January 18, 2022

Assistant professor of Education Foundations, Leadership and Policy David Knight is quoted in an article by the Seattle Times, along with Professor of Education Finance Marguerite Roza, titled Washington students’ test scores drop significantly in first exams since pandemic began. Regarding the drop in state test scores, he stated “I would say that it’s not good news — but not entirely surprising. We know that poverty is the biggest impediment to success in the classroom,” said Knight. “Low-income households were disproportionately impacted by the pandemic. I think the important thing now is that we not let up in our pursuit to close gaps.”

MLK said it best: ‘Love is the greatest force in the universe’

Sunday, January 16, 2022

Vice Provost and Dean of Undergraduate Academic Affairs and Professor of Education Foundations, Leadership and Policy Ed Taylor published a piece for the Seattle Times titled MLK said it best: ‘Love is the greatest force in the universe’. In the piece, Ed celebrates the fierce love of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and honors his uncle Benedict and his sister Mary, two people who, as King did, chose love.

3 key changes for progressive K-12 funding

Friday, January 14, 2022

Assistant professor of Education Foundations, Leadership and Policy David Knight co-penned a piece for the Seattle Times titled 3 key changes for progressive K-12 funding. David uses his expertise in education finance to discuss our state’s flawed school finance system and urges Washington legislators to make three key changes to the state’s finance system, including expanding the Learning Assistance Program (LAP), expanding the Local Effort Assistance program and addressing capital funding.

The 2022 RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings

Wednesday, January 5, 2022

Education Week unveiled the 2022 RHSU (Rick Hess Straight Up) Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings, ranking the university-based scholars in the United States who did the most last year to shape educational practice and policy. Boeing Professor Emeritus of Teacher Education Ken Zeichner, James A. and Cherry A. Banks Professor of Multicultural Education and Director of the Banks Center for Educational Justice Django Paris and alumna Dr. Gloria Ladson-Billings (M.Ed. '72) were included in this year’s rankings, which were chosen by a 33-member selection committee.